Category Archives: #GoSaMo

Kidical Mass(ive) is this Saturday, September 16th

SANTA MONICA KIDICAL MASS GOES MASSIVE… AGAIN!

RSVP email us at RSVP@SMSpoke.org
To volunteer for this or other events email us at Volunteer@SMSpoke.org


Clover Park  at 25th & Oak

 

Performance Bikes will be here doing bike safety checks.  

  • THE THEME WILL AGAIN BE SWASH BUCKLING PIRATES!
    – in Celebration of TALK LIKE A PIRATE DAY!
  • Treasure Hunt and more fun activities planned
  • PRIZES

Join us Saturday, September 16th, 2017 for third Kidical Massive, Global Family Bike Event! 

In 2016 we participated for the second year of the largest “global family bike ride” ever and we’re looking for a bigger and better event in 2017! Join us as thousands of families around the world go for a bike ride together. We’ll be showing that Kids are Traffic Too and that cities that plan for family biking are more livable, sustainable, profitable, and FUN!

You too can organize a ride in your community; register your community and start planning your event now.

Win a real Huffy Cruiser today!

We are at the FREE Buy Local Health and Fitness Festival – join us at Reed Park for the fun and festivities until 4 pm.

70+ exhibitors, workout demo’s, health screenings, and give-a-ways, plus so much more.

We are here with our bike safety skills course for the kids sharing lots of info on biking, Safe Routes to School, and engaging with our community!! Come on over!

Enter to win a FREE Huffy Cruiser from us at Santa Monica Spoke!
Drawing is at 3pm

WALK with the Mayor & Buy Local Health and Fitness Festival NEXT WEEKEND!

Next Saturday September 9th is packed with fun!

Click images for more info:

Start this Saturday, September 9th on a Walk with Mayor Ted Winterer from Reed Park at 10am

Then join us at the Buy Local Health and Fitness Festival starting at 11:am.

We will again have a bike rodeo / obstacle course and we are giving away a Huffy Cruiser!

Join us in boosting your health and happiness by attending this year’s FREE Buy Local Health and Fitness Festival. The festival is packed with fun, with over 70 exhibitors, there will be workout demo’s, health screenings, and give-a-ways, plus so much more. You don’t want to miss it!

We’ll be there sharing lots of info on bike safety, Safe Routes to School, a bike safety skills course for the kids and we are giving away a Huffy Cruiser!! .

Hosted by the @cityofsantamonica @smchamber and @buylocalsm

Upcoming Events!

Click Images for event details and more info –

Twilight Concerts at the Santa Monica Pier: June 17th – August 17th
Jazz on the Lawn Saturdays in August


Thursday, July 27th


Saturday, July 29th

BOTH Family Rally for Playa del Rey and LADOT Open House have been
POSTPONED

Open House

 

 

 

 

 


 

Saturday, July 29th


Sunday, July 30th
Safer Streets 17th Street Ice Cream Social


Future Events and Summer FUN!

August Ride with the Mayor: August 16th
August HandleBar Happy Hour: August 30th
Buy Local Fitness Festival: September 9th
3rd Annual Kidical Mass(ive) Global Family Bike Ride and Festival: September 17th
COAST Open Street Event Santa Monica: October 1st

Visit our event calendar to stay up to date!

Safe Streets for 17th Street Ice Cream Social

Come join us for a day of fun and community outreach for Safe Streets for 17th Street.

Music, games and Ice Cream! A “pop-up” Bike Lane, free helmets and helmet decorating plus a bike obstacle and safety course by Santa Monica Spoke for the Kids!
See the event HERE!

click to see full size flyer

17th Street is experiencing an increase in the number of people walking and biking. People are using the street for neighborhood trips as well as to get to and from the Expo Light Rail station at 17th and Colorado. Members of the community have reached out to say they don’t feel comfortable walking or biking at night or during the early morning along 17th Street. The City is working towards adding safety improvements along 17th Street from Pico Boulevard to Wilshire Boulevard and Michigan Avenue from 14th Street to 19th Street to help address the safety concerns.

Goals:
The goal for the project is to address community concerns and help people feel more safe and comfortable to walk or bike. Another goal of the project is to respond to requests to have the street feel more like a neighborhood street and less of a cut-through street.

The project proposes to improve the pedestrian lighting, create better crosswalks and make people who bike more visible and better protected. Help us make 17th Street safer and more comfortable for everyone.

Please contact Carlos Morales, Senior Transportation Planner for more information, we want to hear from you!

See the event on Facebook

Happy #CarFreeFriday Santa Monica!

Sometimes the little things are HUGE!
Find out more about #CarFreeFriday – even 1 day a week helps – so many possibilities and opportunities for mulit-modal – you may get hooked!

Enjoying deliciousness & #BikeLocal goodness at @cafe_demitasse. So YUMMY! #GoSaMo #BikeLocalSM#ZeroEmissions
#veganfood #coffeetime #bicyclelifestyle#bicyletransport #bicyclelife #bicyclecoffee

On #CarFreeFriday Santa Monica – Community Voices: Why Is Everyone Else Traffic?

By: Community Voices, re-posted with the permission.

This post originally appeared on the blog of local community activist and organizer Luke Klipp. It was republished on Santa Monica Next and their sister site, Longbeachize. Klipp serves as a Metro Board Deputy to Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia and he is the President of the Los Feliz Neighborhood Council. He is also the founder of online organizing efforts “Greater LA” and “Happy Urbanists.” The opinions expressed here are his own

Mis-an-thro-py (noun): A dislike of mankind
Mis-an-thrope (noun): A person who dislikes humankind and avoids human society
Mis-an-thro-pic (adjective): Disliking humankind and avoiding human society

Why is everyone else traffic?

It’s a simple question, really, but it belies a much bigger challenge in a culture that relies so heavily on the most inefficient means of transportation: cars.

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Go to any community meeting discussing a possible new park or creative space or commercial venture or new housing, and the chief concern will be traffic and parking. Watch the local news about a big event coming to town, and the primary areas of focus will be traffic and parking. Traffic reports are as frequently provided on every radio station and every television station as reports of the weather, and more frequently than anything else.

So, again, why is everyone else traffic?

I reflected on this as I sat in the window at our bed and breakfast in Copenhagen, overlooking a street filled with patrons of the bakery downstairs, enjoying their baguettes and pastries while jazz music filtered up the street and a violin could be heard playing in the distance.

There was not a car in sight or in sound, and there were people everywhere. And it was delightful. Oh, and we got to our bed and breakfast from the airport with ease; no congestion, no honking, no exhaust fumes, and no brake lights.

I reflect on this today as I sit at my Los Angeles home, listening to cars roaring past, hearing nary a human voice or instrumental sound.

Engines purr and growl, and an occasional bus makes its presence known with an automated announcement whenever it pauses at the stop across the street. Handfuls of humans churn past in their climate-controlled, self-contained pods, and not one of them can be heard except for the sounds of their engines.

And I reflected on this at a recent community meeting, where the possibility of an outdoor patio at a restaurant was enough to turn out several neighbors in opposition, even though the adjacent street sees tens of thousands of cars, motorcycles, and buses churning past 24/7, creating much louder noise.

Somehow the much-louder sounds of engines barely registered, while the possibility of people audibly enjoying themselves was enough to motivate people to come to community meetings and express their opposition. Recent research has shown that the sound of cars and trucks burdens life, leading to negative health outcomes, and yet that never registers a single comment, despite people’s clear sensitivity to sound.

Misanthropy: A Dislike of Humankind

Our reliance on our cars makes us into misanthropes. But then, every single day, the vast majority of us step into isolated rolling rooms.

When you see this, do you think about everyone else you’re doing this trip with? Or do you just want to get out of this as soon as possible?

By our nature, we are social beings. Yes, some portion of us are naturally more introverted, meaning we recharge when we have space to ourselves; ultimately, however, we know from myriad studies that even just a few days of social isolation will inflict lifelong, permanent emotional and mental trauma upon a person.

  • We see only the backs of others’ heads and we are terrified to look directly into the eyes of another person, because it means that we are headed straight for each other.
  • We communicate through turn signals and brake lights, and almost the only time we hear each others’ voices is on the occasion that we’re yelling a crude remark or expressing frustration (and certainly almost never joy).
  • We are never physically close to each other, needing to leave lots of room to avoid a possible collision that would result in thousands of dollars in damage.
  • We don’t see faces and human interactions; we see brands and driving patterns, learning things like how BMWs and Benzs tend to be reckless, and getting restless when other drivers take time to be thoughtful and careful.
  • We get upset at the inconvenience of someone walking across a street or biking ahead of us, even as their choices mean fewer cars traveling on the street.
  • We want wider streets and faster speeds, with as much space between us and others as possible.

If you were to create a technology with the intention of turning a socially-inclined species against itself, you could hardly do better than the automobile. Neighbors get upset at the prospect of a new local attraction. Shipping interests support efforts that displace thousands from their homes. And people just going to and from work feel empowered to organize in opposition to any effort to save lives and spare many others from a lifetime of medical bills and bankruptcy.

Early in its infancy, the automobile was viewed as an affront to humanity.

But as the technology was promoted by an industry determined to defeat the odds, and as more and more people adopted it, the rules that had once been created to save human lives were co-opted by rules intended to give the automobile industry supremacy, even as that shift has meant the loss of millions of human lives.

We have widened lanes, widened roads, obliterated our street trees, pushed out residences and businesses in droves, and sacrificed untold numbers of human lives, all in obeisance to the great automobile. And where has it gotten us? To hear many people say it, we’ve apparently not done nearly enough, given how much more parking/roadways/et cetera we need.

Finding Our Humanity Again

Rather than not enough, we have already done way, way too much to accommodate cars.

Rather than recognize the value and importance of our neighborhoods, we have turned them into drive-thrus, even banning things like kids’ street games to facilitate faster driving.

Rather than focus on the safety of our most vulnerable street users who travel on foot or on bikes, we have turned them into obstacles that must be minimized.

Rather than confronting and addressing the daily carnage that would be considered horrifying statistics for any other industry, we have and continue to turn a blind eye – over and over – even going so far as to claim that any efforts to stop the bloodshed is “exploitation” of those whose lives and livelihoods it claims.

Yes, our automobiles turn otherwise rational human beings into misanthropes. The question is whether we understand and recognize this and are ready and willing to reassert our humanity.

Which do we value more: our speed or our safety? Which do we recognize as giving back more to the community: our local businesses or our big-box and chain shops? Which do we see more as representing our neighborhoods better: our local, walkable streets or our freeways? What is more meaningful to us: space for our cars or space for our lives?

It’s time for everyone else to stop being traffic and to just be, well, everyone else.

Multiracial Group of Friends with Hands in Stack, Teamwork

July Ride with the Mayor: Parks Tour

Next Saturday, July 15th!

click image for event info

Join us for this months Ride with the Mayor as we Celebrate July Parks Month with a bike tour of lesser known Santa Monica parks with Mayor Ted Winterer.

The ride meets at Reed Park – corner of California and Lincoln. The round-trip bike tour will be approximately 7 miles.

Bring your own bike, helmet & water bottle. Family friendly – however children should be capable of street riding or in an appropriate child seat or trailer.

No bike? No problem! Just grab a Breeze Bike.

ABOUT PARKS MONTH:
This July, #GetOutside and discover all the wonderful parks the City of Santa Monica Government has to offer by coming out to celebrate #SaMoParks. A variety of fun activities are planned for residents of all ages and abilities in celebration of all the ways parks and recreation has the power to transform our daily lives and wellbeing. For a full list of activities, visit smgov.net/parksmonth or tune in to Active Santa Monica.

Upcoming events: Kidical Mass and Ride with the Mayor!

Mark your calendar for the upcoming two Saturday events:
Kidical Mass & Ride with the Mayor!

Kidical Mass: July 4th Theme:
Saturday, July 8th

click image for event details

Celebrate July Parks Month on a Bike Tour with Santa Monica Mayor Ted Winterer!
Saturday, July 15th

click image for event details

Letter to City Council on Vision Zero Implementation

How will Santa Monica’s leadership commit to this effort over the next two years? These are our asks, Agenda Item 9A.

June 27, 2017

Dear Mayor, City Council, City management and staff

With the number of crashes involving fatalities or serious injuries still climbing at alarming rates — we reaffirm that the time is now to make a strong commitment to Vision Zero and a true and meaningful investment in safer streets.

On May 9th Council gave clear direction they wanted staff to explore the creation of a staff coordinator to implement the City’s commitment to Vision Zero and the need to see real results in reducing serious traffic injuries and fatalities on our streets. Staff’s recommendation appears to be an incomplete response to council’s direction of creating a position to expedite implementation and to coordinate and capitalize on external and interdepartmental opportunities that may otherwise be lost.

In Santa Monica we have a demonstrated history of how talented and dedicated staff have produced undeniable successes and results. We are aiming for, and have achieved, huge environmental and sustainability successes, such as successful water conservation, implemented a nationally-recognized Wellness Project, and increased biking, a healthy active mobility option that contributes to a healthier environment and community. All of these successes have been reached by dedicating staff and money to achieve these results. The ultimate cost for not meeting our Vision Zero goals is loss of life. Money doesn’t have a brain or specific expertise, money cannot make the strategic and tactical decisions to achieve our ultimate commitment to our City’s safety goals and Vision Zero — Only people can, the time to start is now.

Fixing problems is more intensive and costs money. Preventative measures save money and in this case save lives. We are now faced with “fixing” outdated planning policies of an auto centric 50’s that have recently made safety on our streets exponentially worse — we must be proactive in identifying and addressing solutions. Santa Monica must continue to be a catalyst and leader in protecting the lives of our residents and visitors. We heard our City Manager recount how Bill Bratton was laughed at because he wanted to “prevent crimes”. However that didn’t stop him and he made his vision a reality in NY! Let us not laugh off proactive implementation to reach our commitment to a safer Santa Monica and Vision Zero. We must progress beyond words on a page and create a proactive, transparent system with dedicated funding and specific actions toward this effort if we truly want to succeed in reducing preventable traffic injuries and fatalities in 10 years.

We understand there are many tradeoffs as we discuss the very real budgetary and financial issues for running our city. There can be no tradeoffs when it comes to the lives of our community and the epidemic of serious injuries and traffic fatalities we are now facing locally, regionally and nationally — we must not continue to dehumanize these preventable deaths and injuries by making them so abstract that they seem as though they are someone else’s problem. With this two year budget we must demonstrate true leadership and real investment in the safety of our community. We ask that council’s direction be followed and that we expedite necessary changes in practice to institutionalize, catalyze and guide efforts and focus to achieve our goals. We fully support the monetary proposal to jump-start and implement key safety projects. However it is imperative that we use a data-driven process and capable leadership to implement strategies that evaluate our progress and institute adjustments as necessary without collectively diluting the efforts of an already busy staff who continue to implement successes in other related and important roles.

In Santa Monica we lead with initiatives like the Wellbeing Project that prioritizes human health and safety. Let’s continue this legacy and keep our streets safe as we encourage active transportation that must also reflect council’s priority to our Vision Zero Policy and infrastructure that removes safety barriers to make it a viable choice for our community — in addition to the framework to make safety implementation real.

This letter is submitted by Cynthia Rose for Santa Monica Spoke and Cris Gutierrez for Climate Action Santa Monica.


See our previous letter to Santa Monica City Council on Vision Zero HERE

Santa Monica Forward’s shared their values on the budget and Vision Zero HERE